Cafe Yagam

25 J. Felipe St., Baguio, Benguet

Cafe Yagam
4.5 Stars

7 Reviewers

  • 5 stars 3
  • 4 stars 3
  • 3 stars 1
  • 2 stars 0
  • 1 star 0
  • 7 Reviews
  • 14 Recommend
  • 7 Reviewers
Business Hours
Reopens: 11:00a - 11:00p


  • Sunday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p
  • Monday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p
  • Tuesday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p
  • Wednesday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p
  • Thursday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p
  • Friday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p
  • Saturday
    • 11:00a - 11:00p

Payment Options


More Business Info

Street, Parking Lot
Lunch, Dinner

Most Recent Reviews

Yugie C.
5.0 Stars

Best arabica coffee & rice cake merienda/dessert I ever had -- Kiniwar! You must be crazy if you say this pair doesn't cut it. But to brag about these is an understatement. Cafe Yagam is a carafe of friendly team of people, a cozy low key shop, delicious home grown native Baguio delicacies/dishes and coffee procured from local farmers. I take my coffee black, and although I'm not an expert not a self proclaimed connoisseur either, I know coffee when it's good. It's a shame we only spent one night in Baguio.

  • No. of Comments: 0
Edwin I.
5.0 Stars

There is place in the Baguio that sits somewhat close to the usual crowded popular haunts, but surprisingly offers a private, uncrowded, and truly relaxed venue for some cozy evenings. The place seemingly pays homage to local Cordillera specialties. The place also offers affordable good local coffee , local spirits, coffee preps, mains and sweets that are indigenous to the Cordillera region. The best part is partaking these treats around a warm toasty bonfire with live acoustic music under the cool mountain evening sky. This is Cafe Yagam.

The place is an old home converted into a cafe. There are cozy indoor sittings amidst local artsy handicrafts. However, to my mind, the best seat in the house on cool, clear, star lit evening , would be their front yard. Nothing fancy, but more of a truly relaxed and cozy venue for some chilled out evenings. Low wooden benches and stools repurposed from felled logs encircle a nice toasty bonfire. A common sitting circle where you end up chilling with other guests and end up making new friends. Relaxing acoustic music played live from the inner dining area pours out to the bonfire seating.

This visit was for night cap after dinner. With evening temperatures reading a low 11 C, we decided to "brave" the cold and hang around their bonfire. We passed on their mains and appetizers. Instead went straight for their other specialties---Coffee from Arabica beans harvested in the region. We coupled this with some coffee preps, a couple of Cordillera brewed Spirits, and local sweets.

We are loving Cafe Yagam's brewed coffee, local red wine, and coffee preps (latte and Bailey's Coffee). My first time tries, I'm loving the Cordillera delicacy called Kiniwar and Cafe Yagam's Cordillera-American fusion dessert-- Yagam's Jar.

What we loved about their Arabica brew was the choice of strength and brewing method offered to guests. We opted for their filter drip, medium-strength. The Arabica brew was deliciously aromatic with earthy notes. Taste wise, the brew was perfectly acidic, chocolatey, with light nutty notes. The beverage was served in a glass carafe that nicely made two-coffee cup servings. Not bad for just 60 bucks.

Their local Red wine was a sweet wine made from indigenous red berries called Bignay. These berries, indigenous to the Cordilleras, are also called wild cherries/ wild currants. The fruits are used to make tea and wine. Perhaps, a red much too sweeter than what wine lovers are used too. But what I enjoyed from the sweet red was the "cocktail-ish" sweetness with a nice warmth and buzz from the local wine that made perfect for a really cold evening. It's sweetness was like a fuller mix of sweet dessert wine and sangria with stronger berry notes.

Their Cordillera sweet delicacies were also unique and quite good.

The Kiniwar was a local version of sweet sticky rice with coconut cream. A marriage of Biko and Suman. I loved that the rice was really sticky and chewy, drenched in sweet coconut cream syrup, with curdled caramelized coconut cream latik. Sweetness level was spot on. The delicacy, just 55 bucks. Excellent with the brewed coffee.

They also had a unique dessert that seemed to be a fusion between Cordillera and American desserts. The dish , called Yagam's Jar, was an odd yet quite delicious mix of kamote cheese cake, taro/sago pearls, and caramelized sweet fruits. Served in a jar, the dessert was a layer of Graham, cheesecake, mashed sweet potatoes cooked with caramel, sweetened taro pearls, and topped with caramelized fruit slices (I couldn't tell if they used apples or pears). Quite surprisingly, the odd dessert was really good. Tarty-creamy-sweet with various textures from the different ingredients. Quite affordable for just 80 bucks. Yummy with a flute of their Bailey's spiked coffee.

Their latte, comfortingly robust with the arabica brew and creamy with the frothed milk. A big mug, just 80 bucks.

A visit to Baguio during long weekends can be quite an ordeal rather than a relaxing break. Seemingly, the heavy human and vehicle traffic from the Metro has relocated to the City of Pines causing heavily crowded places and stand-still road traffic. It is such a treat coming across nicely private enclaves in the Summer Capital that offers such relaxing, uncrowded venues such as Cafe Yagam.

Cafe Yagam comes highly recommended to foodies looking for a rather private relaxed place to hang out with local indigenous delicacies and beverages to boot .

  • No. of Comments: 2
Rocky R.
4.0 Stars

Cafe Yagam is best known for their arabica coffee, wherein beans have been hand picked from where it's grown--the Cordillera Region. Unfortunately, I'm not a coffee connoisseur, nor am I a coffee consumer to review the caffeinated beverages they offer, but what I will review, which I'm more knowledgeable of, is the food that they have. But before I continue, let me first say that Cafe Yagam is one of a kind. One word to describe this cafe is cozy.

From its façade, you would think it's just an ordinary house, but when entering this place, you feel as if you were inside a log cabin. I was taken aback by the dim setting, hardwood tables and chairs, and other aesthetically pleasing furnishings which shouts art in all of its aspect.

Apart from their well-known coffee, Cafe Yagam offers native Cordilleran dishes, such as Pinuneg (₱200); Cordilleran blood sausages. This is served with red rice and stif-fried vegetables. Blood sausages are a foodie's food. The crisp snap from the casing and the bold flavor of the blood, dipped in a pungent and spicy vinegar makes this dish some kind of wonderful. When eating just the sausages, it may be salty to some, but have it with the red rice, the flavor will balance well. This dish, too includes kiniwar, a sticky rice dessert.

Another dish that has a great balance of flavor is Bilis Shitake (₱130). It's a pasta dish with dilis and shiitake mushrooms. The balance of saltiness of the dilis, and the woodsy flavor the mushroom brings, accompanied by olive oil was outstanding.

Because Cafe Yagam is far from town (Session Rd), you are surrounded by a peaceful and quiet environment, with serenity of its interior and outside surroundings of foliage. Cafe Yagam are for those who look for that type of ambiance.

  • No. of Comments: 17
Aldrick Chiki A.
5.0 Stars

Homey ambiance + great food = perfection! Their specialties are usually homegrown and it really gives you that Cordilleran taste! Try their Pinuneg, Pinikpikan, Binungor, and Kini-ing!

  • No. of Comments: 3
Russel F.
4.0 Stars

After a quick sightseeing and photo op at The Mansion, we went to Café Yagam for the curtain call of our "When in Baguio" foodventure. The hidden gem was located at J. Felipe st. somewhere I didn't know actually, but few meters away from Burnham Park. 128513

I was fascinated by the look of the café - homey and chill out. There were some nice spots around that deserves a snapshot - a guitar on the dark corner with shading lights from the window, the native tables & chairs, the fireplace and the mini-stage near the gate. They serve pastries, coffee, some entreés and even some items for sale like bags, handcrafted stuff and a lot more.

We tried different drinks, while I settled for the Cafe Latte for my drink. We also got a plate of both of their best-selling sticky rice desserts and thought both were good. I forgot which of the two was my favorite (that actually stood out among the other). The coffee was okay, kinda weak for my liking although I'm not totally a coffeeholic person myself.

The place was so perfect for chit chats and hangouts with friends. Although it's not that much eclectic like Arca's Yard, but this was also good in some factors. You might want to consider this place a visit if you're looking for some nice, peaceful and less mainstream spot when in Baguio. 128522

  • No. of Comments: 10
Zia M.
4.0 Stars

While we were wandering the small streets of Baguio, I was thinking where in the world am I? 128518

Hidden somewhere in the breezy streets, is a cool and chill and cozy coffee shop called Cafe Yagam.

I was awed by the wooden furnitures and the fireplace they have inside plus they have different types of seats to choose from. Awesome!

I ordered a Lemon grass tea, because I am just really full from the ribs that we had in Canto.

For a Php40.00, I can enjoy a soothing and sweet lemon grass tea! 128523 I liked the calming sensation it brought to me, I feel kind of sleepy afterwards.

I tasted some of my friends orders, like the kakanin that they had, and I find it okay.

I would probably be going back here during the night because they have bonfire and it excites me!!! 127756

  • No. of Comments: 10
3.0 Stars

One of the must visit cafes in Baguio. It's a little hard to find as its one of the side streets so Waze will be your best friend for this cafe hunt.

Once you get there, it'll be a feast for the eyes because the Cafe looks like a hipster's haven. The outside tables are a mix of hard wood tables, futons, bohemian lamps, and an eating area which also doubles as a performing stage. The inside is a quant dining area but the fixtures are a mix of modern elements and indigenous furniture. But it works! The menu is so artsy too.

They also have coffee drying bins outside and you would occasionally see a girl sifting newly roasted coffee beans so you know it's all fresh and meticulously prepared.

The coffee however needs some work - the mid roast I tried lacked the kick from the usual Benguet coffee's I've tasted. A little tweak here and there and it will do boat loads of improvement. I just think it lacked some more roasting and a little more time to simmer before doing the paper drip process.

Their dessert items are okay. Nothing special. One of their rice cakes reminds me of the bilo-bilo in ginataan so I enjoyed the texture. But overall it was just mediocre.

Best to go here when they have bonfire sessions and music jamming night 128077

  • No. of Comments: 0