Vigan Heritage Village

Calle Crisologo, Vigan, Ilocos Sur

Vigan Heritage Village
4.7
4.5 Stars

68 Reviewers

  • 5 stars 51
  • 4 stars 12
  • 3 stars 5
  • 2 stars 0
  • 1 star 0
  • 72 Reviews
  • 124 Recommend
  • 68 Reviewers
Category:
Landmarks

Most Recent Reviews

Jorelle F.
3.0 Stars
2

Finally, I got to walk passed through this historic street in Vigan. I thought it was still residential or it has small cafés/restos, to my dismay it was like an array of abandoned buildings. Some stores offer pasalubong stuff and must try delicacies. It could've been better if the old ambiance is open for chit chats over a cup of coffee or the likes. Nevertheless its still IG worthy. 97869786

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Muffy T.
5.0 Stars
5

The Vigan Heritage Village in Ilocos Sur is about 405 kilometers or an eight-hour drive from Manila. This place is said to be the best-preserved example of a planned Spanish colonial town in Asia. The architecture, specifically on Calle Crisologo, reflects Spanish, Mexican, and Old Philippine influence. The entire place is stunningly beautiful at any time of the day.

There are a number of places to see, things to do, and food to eat in Vigan; the most popular attraction is Calle Crisologo.

One can usually see tourists line and walk the cobblestone street of Calle Crisologo, since is a major attraction in Vigan for those who want to experience being transported back to the period in Philippine Spanish colonial time.

Vigan City in Ilocos Sur was recently named one of the New 7 Wonder Cities of the Word in a global campaign that searched for incredible cities through an online capaign. Joining Vigan in the list of New 7 Wonder Cities are Beirut (Lebanon), Doha (Qatar), Durban (South Africa), Havana (Cuba), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), and La Paz (Bolivia).

#henrysinstaxgiveaway

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Marjorie L.
5.0 Stars
3

Looking for a last minute getaway before school starts? Then this is definitely the place to go to.

The historic town of Vigan. The city is located on the western coast of the large island of Luzon, facing the South China Sea. It is also the capital of Ilocos Sur. Vigan is one of the few remaining 16th century towns here in the Philippines. It is well preserved and gives you that Spanish era feel when you go there. It's a romantic place for lovers, but for me it is a town filled with a historical ambiance that gives you this nostalgic feeling inside of you. Personally, I prefer people going to Vigan at night to stroll along the famous Crisologo Street because it's much more beautiful at night which gives you this romantic kind of vibe. Also Plaza Burgos opens up to St. Paul’s Cathedral while on the other side, Plaza Salcedo opens up to the Municipal Hall.

Vigan has remained it's authenticity because of it's grid street pattern and the houses built along it. At present, some houses in Vigan are well maintained by the owners to preserve the authenticity of it while the other houses are neglected by their home owners which makes it out of shape. Preserving this place is a must because it's such a historical town and it represents a unique design and construction which gives the whole place the European look.

This place is definitely a must to visit and I'm glad I did.

#henrysinstaxgiveaway

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Aileen L.
5.0 Stars
5

VIVA VIGAN! Lucky that I was able to see finally one of the New 7 Wonder Cities, VIGAN.

This was our second itinerary of our Ilocos Trip last April 29. Thanks to Ilocos Heritage Tours and Travel for making this a hassle free trip. Thanks to Keith for arranging all of our itinerary and of course the man behind the success of Ilocos Heritage, Sir Jan Carlo Caldito) he is known as the best tour guide in Ilocos and were lucky to have their service.

Vigan Heritage Village is now a UNESCO World Heritage Center. It is established in 16th century and it was the best preserved example of a planned Spanish Colonial town in Asia. I am deeply impressed how they were able to preserve those old houses. Vigan is really unique in preserving as much it's Hispanic Colonial character particularly its grid street pattern and urban layout.

There were calesa ride if you wish to explore the place, a lot of souvenir shops with a very affordable price and this is what's enjoyed most , there were restaurants too in the area where you can have a taste of true Ilocano cuisine and perfect place for picture taking.

Bucket list ✅

If I would be ask by a tourist from a foreign land I would be very proud to recommend this place to visit.

VIGAN is 10084

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Jah P.
5.0 Stars

100841008410084

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Clarissa P.
5.0 Stars
5

Our first stop during our Ilocos Family Road trip was Vigan. I was actually planning a Loag-Pagudpud-Vigan route but since hubby and dad got tired of the long drive and we were already in Vigan, we decided to make it as our first stop.

Vigan has been declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of of the intact Spanish houses that it's proud of. Calle Crisologo is probably the most visited place in Vigan. It's a long stretch of street where motorized vehicles are not allowed. You can either walk or ride a Calesa. The sides of the entire street is lined with old Hispanic Houses. It's as if you are right smack into the streets described in Noli Me Tangere and El Fili. It's old world vibe and charm was amazing. Hubby and I sat on the side streets and just marveled at the beautiful scenery. Some of the houses have been fully restored, some were being worked on. You will not see a single modern house or even building along this street.

The whole stretch of this street has been converted into a commercial area as well. You can buy souvenirs like key chains, ref magnets, shirts, towels, blankets, furniture (both small scale and the real ones), etc etc. You can also find some stores selling the famous Bagnet and Vigan Longga. When you walk towards the plaza of Vigan City, Calle Crisologo is transformed into a foodie haven with lots of restaurants lined up - both local and those found in the Metro. There were also cafes and small eateries as you take detours towards the side streets.

It's a busy place, I must say. We went there at night and in the morning and people kept coming.

Hubby and I enjoyed this place so much. We took our time to appreciate the old world presented by Calle Crisologo. We took our time discovering cafes and good finds as well - both for pasalubong and for personal keepsake. We bought dirty ice cream (avocado was my chosen flavor and it was so good!) and sat by a bench to people watch and chit-chat. Maybe we're just simple like that because if you're looking for adventure and thrill or maybe something extravagant, you won't find it here.

Being in Calle Crisologo was like being in another world. Away from all the modernization, the tall buildings and the buzz of the Metro. Great place to visit if you like history or if you're a laid back traveler. Also very picturesque so you might wanna drop by quickly here to take pictures and of course - selfies lol

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Cherilyn I.
5.0 Stars

This is life!!!!!

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Eric N.
5.0 Stars

Where did the name "Vigan" come from?

At the time of Spanish colonization, the Chinese settlers from the Fujian province in China called the area “Bee Gan”, meaning “beautiful shore”. Since the Spaniards often interchanged the “b” and the “v” to refer to the “b” sound, they spelled the Chinese name as Vee Gan.

Another anecdote passed on from generation to generation tells of how Captain Juan de Salcedo was walking along the banks of the Mestizo river and asked one of the locals the name of the place, in Spanish. The locals, thinking that he was asking for the name of the plant that grew abundantly along the banks, promptly said “Bigaa”. Bigaa being a taro plant belonging to the gabi family.

What is certain, though, is that Vigan used to be an island, separated from the Luzon mainland by three rivers – the Abra, the Govantes, and the Mestizo. But heavy siltation drained the waters of the Mestizo River.

Vigan is a testament to our heritage, being the country’s most extensive and only surviving historic city that dates back to the 16th century Spanish colonial period.

This rich history and heritage also runs through the streets of the famous Calle Crisologo or Calle Mena Crisologo, named after the writer and respected son of Ilocos, Mena Pecson Crisologo, who served as the first provincial governor and was a delegate to the Malolos Congress.

It is this line of Spanish Era ancestral houses and cobble-stoned streets which led to Vigan's inclusion in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1999. And in 2015, it was officially recognized as one of the New 7 Wonders Cities.

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Gladys M.
5.0 Stars

One out of seven wonders of the world. Best time to visit this place is on weekdays. Plenty of stores to buy some pasalubong.

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Zobee A.
4.0 Stars

I love the vibe of the old houses. It has a character that made my mind travel back in time and think of different stories in every corner of the village.

According to our tour guide, in the olden times a Japanese was in love with a filipina who lives in this village. The reason why it was not destroyed or bombed during the war was because the said japanese man put a flag on the roofs of the houses. Thus, this village was preserved.

A picturesque village indeed. 128077🏼128077🏼128077🏼

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Amyxal V.
5.0 Stars

Going into a time warp. Whether during the day or at night this UNESCO World Heritage Site is always enchanting.

Some say it's best to stroll Calle Crisologo at dawn. Would try to do that next time if there's a chance to visit Vigan again.

The only eyesore there was a few trash (especially McDo items). Just a few but still, nakaka-turn-off. We picked up the trash and disposed of them properly. The funny thing was there were bins near where they threw away their trash listlessly. If we want to preserve our national treasures -- natural or historical -- we must do our part, as tourists, to take care of them by as simple as disposing of our trash properly. That's all.

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Gene C.
5.0 Stars

So much to explore in this city yet so little time. Hay, I wish I could stay here for a week.

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Gene C.
5.0 Stars

Spending Christmastime in Ilocos Sur. Technically, it's our second time in Vigan but we only slept here in my uncle's house to rest when we we first visited earlier this year. Basically sleep and run ang peg.

This time, dumating kami ng hapon so more time to explore the city for a bit. I love Calle Crisologo. Reminds me so much of Intramuros, which is one of my fave places in Manila. I wish I could stay here longer. Most of the shops are souvenir shops. We skipped riding the calesa (with so much disappointed from Offspring) because father-in-law is tired from driving from Marikina to Vigan tapos traffic pa sa La Union. Medyo nagmamadali na kami sa pamamasyal.

We checked out the hotels near the area. I-plan na ang future vacation here!

#wanderinggene

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Melissa Joyce B.
5.0 Stars

Spanish colonial architecture 127972128146 Feels like you're part of the History. 128522128522

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April H.
5.0 Stars

#veryverylatepostagain

Reminiscing about the time when I frequented Ilocos... Their beaches are beautiful and the food is amazing, but nothing says Vigan like Calle Crisologo...

It's one of the few places in our country with beautifully preserved cobblestone streets and Spanish era houses... It feels like you are transported back in time when you step foot in this place... For me, time also feels slower, as you walk down the street, admiring the architechture, the wooden furniture and the capiz windows... Horse drawn carriages pass by, giving people more of a taste of an era that has gone by... Being here makes me think of how my great great grandparents must have seen the world, it's raw beauty and simplicity many years back...

Upon reaching the center, there are a multitude of shops that sell beautiful bags and shawls, all locally made... I love talking with the shop owners, who are all so proud to be working at this place... I truly love visiting this place...

IMO, the recent renovation is a sacrilege and a disservice to the area... The colored facade detracts from the old world feel of the place...128545 But still, a must visit for all Filipinos...

As I said before, I used to like taking pics with me in them... Pardon the quality, digicams were just starting to become available at that time!128514128514128514 Must visit again soon!128522

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Marjorie G.
5.0 Stars

You haven’t been to Vigan until you’ve set foot on its central point of attraction, the Heritage Village. Going to this place is without a question, the best part in this whole Vigan experience. There are simply no words to give justice to its exquisiteness. I was completely mesmerized by its beauty; made me feel like I had been sent back in time.

The old buildings and houses built in the Spanish area had been well preserved. No wonder it gained the honor of being included in UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites. It’s beautiful at night and even more splendid under the morning light.

Horse-drawn carriages (calesa) roam about the cobbled-stone lane of Mena Crisologo. Souvenir shops that sell bargain books, antique pieces, bags, accessories, and other curious finds lined up the street. Feeling hungry? The street has bakery, cafes, and small restaurants.

The Heritage Village is one of the most beautiful places you will ever see in the Philippines. It wouldn't be recognized by UNESCO for nothing.

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Larah L.
5.0 Stars

Ganda. Looks like the old towns in europe. Wish the cobblestones could be extended

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Reich T.
5.0 Stars

Vigan is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in that it is one of the few Hispanic towns left in the Philippines where its structures remained intact, and is well known for its cobblestone streets and a unique architecture that fuses Philippine and Oriental building designs and construction, with colonial European architecture.

Source: Wikipedia

Here lies Calle Crisologo.  This was named after the Ilocano writer Mena Pecson Crisologo.  He penned Don Calixtofaro de la Kota Caballero de la Luna, Codigo Municipal and the Ilocano novel called Minig wenno Ayat ti Kararwa.

Calle Crisologo is known for cobblestone streets and old houses.  Walking down the the cobblestone streets reminds you of Crisostomo Ibarra and Maria Clara.  This is a place of beauty,  history and a reminder of the influence of the Spaniards in our culture.

I got to check some of the old houses and everything was vintage,  the furniture,  the wooden floors and the capiz windows.  Each piece of furniture has a story to tell (I like to come up with my own version in my head)

Some of the tourists take the Calesa to complete the old world feel.  I prefer walking as you get to see the amazing architecture of the structures up close.  Experience the serene vibe it exudes and fake a British accent while you're at it. 

I am glad i got to visit Calle Crisologo before the local government bastardized some of the structures by messing up the renovations. I saw a couple of recent photos of the structures and it's an eye sore.

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Tommy T.
4.0 Stars

Been to this place several times before, despite being voted as one of the new wonder cities of the world recently, we do not know how to preserve our heritage, look a the newly renovated buildings painted with shocking colors like orange, green, that stick out like sore thumb. It did not blend well with it's surrounding area that retained the old white or off white color. Commercial interest has prevailed. Quoting Heneral Luna, bayan o negosyo ?

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Jen O.
5.0 Stars

Take a walk to calle crisologo will definitely bring you back in phil spanish colonial time. It's my second time here and as always, i really admired those heritage houses and the cobblestones streets. If you want to buy something for pasalubong, they have shops along the way.

P.S. Credit to the one who took the photo.

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